• slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
  • slider Image
Home > WaterR2B > Sectors > Industry

Industry

Water is a vital component in many manufacturing processes. In some instances (eg electronics) there is a need for access to ultra-pure water, while for all industries there needs to be some assurance of an uninterrupted supply of appropriate quality water.  Wherever possible, water intensive manufacturing industries will locate their operations close to abundant water supplies. However, where other issues are important – eg other raw materials or skilled labour – water can become a much more critical issue.  For example, the October 2011 flooding in Thailand disrupted the global centre for manufacture of semiconductor components –with resulting knock-on effects that hit not only computer sales, but also production of cameras, DVD’s, set-top boxes, and automobiles.  NERC science has contributed to better understanding of which areas are at greatest risk from flooding.  Similarly, the manufacturing industry was preparing from water restrictions should the 2010-12 drought in southern UK have continued through to a third winter. Many manufacturing sites now operate closed loop systems that minimise the total use of water, with recycling processes designed to achieve zero discharge of any water to mains sewers or to the natural environment. 

Water is both an essential resource, and a potential risk, to the extractive industries.  A secure source of water is essential for many mining and quarrying sites – being used in extraction, washing and processing of mineral products.  Flooding is also a major risk to mining and quarrying operations, while continuous dewatering are one of the major operating costs for the industry.  Similarly, droughts and related water restrictions can curtail operations.  At a global scale, information that is developed by NERC concerning long term trends in water availability and frequency of extreme events provide information to guide industry investment decisions. The industry works is bound by demanding environmental regulations that set abstraction rates, waters quality standards for run off from operating sites, impacts upon adjacent ecosystems, and how water is managed after those operations have ceased. 

 
 
6 comments
Sector: Industry
Landfill leachates result from the percolation of water through the solid wastes that have been disposed of in landfills. Such leachates are made of cocktails of a variety of toxic organic and inorganic substances.
Read More

 
 
0 comments
Sector: Industry
Balmoral Tanks is based in Aberdeen and is a leading European designer and manufacturer of GRP, steel and cylindrical water tanks, sewage treatment plants, rainwater harvesting systems and fuel oil storage products.
Read More

 
 
0 comments
Sector: Industry
By 2025, it is estimated that five and a half billion people - two-thirds of the world’s population - will live in countries that are classified as ‘water stressed’. A growing population, changing diet and increasing production of bio-fuels will put intolerable pressure on depleted water resources with implications for global security, health and lifespan.
Read More

 
 
2 comments
Sector: Industry
Many of South Wales’ former mining areas continue to suffer from impoverished rivers due to mine water pollution. The high levels of iron and other metals are potentially damaging to the health and landscape of these communities.
Read More

 
 
0 comments
Sector: Industry
Water pollution from abandoned mine workings is a global problem: it is estimated that 19,300 km of rivers in the USA and 5,000 km of rivers in Europe are affected by acid rock drainage. Treatment requires the installation of specialist systems to reduce acidity, dissolved metals and suspended solids before waters can be released into the environment.
Read More